Could remote working be the future of work?

Could remote working be the future of work?

Working remotely has become a lifeline for UK businesses

As all the normal rules for business and social interactions are shredded daily by the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, working remotely has become a lifeline for UK businesses.

Many organisations that have previously ignored remote working are making an overnight u-turn, or those that only allowed hybrid working when team workloads overflowed, now need a framework, some rules and fast ideas for keeping morale up.

But with enforced working from home likely to last for weeks and months, how will teams sustain their productivity? How can executives reorienting their businesses hope to ensure remote workers’ focus and mindfulness?

Some enterprise WAN managers slow to adopt zero trust security measures

Some enterprise WAN managers slow to adopt zero trust security measures

Apparently, some enterprise WAN managers don’t have a lot of trust (yet) in zero trust security measures, according to a report. While 50% of enterprise WAN managers said in a survey that they are adopting or considering zero trust security, only 8% have implemented it, according to market and consulting firm TeleGeography.

“Zero trust” is one of those phrases that is bandied about at industry conferences and events. With zero trust architecture embedded in a network, all of the users are isolated from the corporate network, but are still able to directly access their authorized applications. In a zero trust implementation, no user or device is trusted inside or outside of a network.

Zero trust security has been implemented in the IT security sector for some time, and is starting to branch out at as security threats evolve. Zero trust includes policy-based controls instead of the legacy “castle and moat” protection, such as sandboxes.

The Networking People (TNP) SECURES PLACE ON GOVERNMENT SCHEME

The Networking People (TNP) SECURES PLACE ON GOVERNMENT SCHEME

Lancaster-based public sector digital network specialist TNP has been named as a supplier on the government’s gigabit capable connectivity scheme.

The Crown Commercial Service dynamic purchasing system (DPS) has been established to assist departments and councils eyeing up the high capacity technology.

TNP is now one of a handful of UK companies on the system, which gives public sector buyers access to pre-approved suppliers qualified to introduce the connectivity that is becoming “increasingly important for efficient and effective operation”.

Commercial director Chris Wade said: “Our proven track-record developing innovative and cost-effective services for public sector clients means that we understand the issues they face, and demonstrates we can be trusted to add value to their network development.

“Being part of the framework makes it easier for customers to partner with TNP and reduces their costs without compromising on our exceptional service levels.”

Last year, TNP moved into a £1m head office in Lancaster to house more than 40 staff.

Figures show that Suppliers complain most about Health customers paying their bills on time.

Figures show that Suppliers complain most about Health customers paying their bills on time.

The Crown Commercial Service (CCS) have released the latest details of complaints received from Suppliers via their Public Procurement Review Service.

The results across the board show that most complaints are lower for 2019 than 2018, particularly in Procurement Process, the biggest complaint type is now Payment which has grown by 63% on the on the previous year. Generally this refers to invoices not being settled in 30 days, something that the Government has set its sights on reducing.