BT Reportedly Preparing to Defend Against £15bn Takeover Attempt

BT Reportedly Preparing to Defend Against £15bn Takeover Attempt

Mainstream media reports have today claimed that a number of major private equity firms are exploring the possibility of making a joint bid for the whole BT Group, which could be worth up to £15bn. In response the operator has reportedly asked Goldman Sachs to update its bid defence strategy.

At present BT’s market capitalisation is estimated to be around £10bn, although a fair few analysts believe that the company is undervalued following a string of problems over the past few years. Meanwhile the Government’s recent decision to ban Huawei from the 5G mobile network, as well as a suspension of their dividend (partly to help fund the £12bn roll-out of FTTP broadband technology) and the COVID-19 crisis hasn’t helped.

The Five levels of Distributed Working

The Five levels of Distributed Working

With the lock-down and social distancing causing people to work remotely, you would expect productivity to slow down. However, many organisations are experiencing an increase in efficiency, as staff no longer have the stress, time, cost or need to commute. In addition, they don’t have the distractions of office life with an opportunity to create a workday that suits them and their family and factoring in their productivity peaks. This could be the start of unlocking the potential of distributed work.

Virtual Visits: The New Future of Tech Support

Virtual Visits: The New Future of Tech Support

As economies across the globe begin reopening, conversations have turned to when the world will begin to go “back to normal.” After four months of lockdown—with restrictions in place that dictate who you can see, where you can go and what you can do—the world is eager to return to “normal” life. Unfortunately, going back to normal may not be as easy as it sounds, or as beneficial as people think.

Until the world went into lockdown, many industries were fairly predictable. There were no forces pushing businesses to think outside of the box or to alter the status quo dramatically. Internet service providers (ISPs) were no different. They had internet speeds defined for home and office use, customer service providers available to answer questions in the event of an emergency, and technicians to go into people’s homes to solve any other issues. Things worked fine, albeit a little inefficiently. But when the world went into lockdown, ISPs were forced to reimagine how they provided customer service, which has led to some fantastic results.